Trusted Referrals & Accurate Information Regarding Duct Cleaning
14 Feb 2019

More homeowners say air-duct-cleaning crew scammed them following FOX 5 report

RINCE GEORGE’S COUNTY, Md. (FOX 5 DC) – Prince George’s County police are asking residents to call them if they feel they’ve been scammed by a Sears air-duct cleaning crew’s tactics.

Several residents say they saw an air-duct-cleaning ad promising that the job would be done for $99 – but ultimately they paid thousands.

After FOX 5 talked to one man whose bill ballooned from $99 to nearly $6,000, several residents contacted the station saying the same three men had done the same thing to them.

Ironically, while FOX 5 was interviewing Bill Butler in Fort Washington, the air-duct cleaning crew was busy at work on their next victim.

Cheryl Clark lives about seven minutes away from Bill Butler and his family – they’re strangers but they share a similar experience.

“I should have realized at the time what was going on but I just didn’t,” Clark said.

Like Butler, Clark says he saw the $99 Sears air-duct cleaning ad in the paper and made an appointment on Wednesday morning.

The same three men who showed up at the Butlers’ home also knocked on Clark’s door.

“They didn’t even look at the vents, they just went directly to the furnace and pulled the furnace thing down. There was a little rust in there on the coils and there was a little soot which everybody has I’m sure but he told me it was mold,” Clark said.

She says that less than an hour later, she was billed more than $5,000.

“They gave me two UV lights, they said I had to have that to keep the mold out of the furnace system. That was $600 apiece. Installation of the lights was $200 and that consisted of a little tiny hole, drilled into the furnace duct and plugged into something and that was it,” Clark said. “They said the sanitizer was $400. I found out that came from a spray can, a $12 spray can. The fogger system to treat the bacteria was this little machine — that was $2,000.”

Checkbook.org Executive Director Kevin Brasler says the crew is defrauding these people.

“You have companies out there that are engaging in this bait and switch tactic where they say it’s $99 and then they always find something and it cost thousands of dollars to initiate the repair,” he said.

“That’s fraud, that’s actually a crime to do that.”

But he added there’s a larger issue at play.

“The fact is the vast majority of homeowners never need to have their ducts cleaned. It intuitively makes sense, but the fact is that the testing that’s been done in this industry is that cleaning the dust out of your ducts doesn’t have any benefit to you,” Brasler said.

After learning about FOX 5’s story, Sears offered Butler a full refund.

Clark is hoping for the same resolution.

Sears says they are re-evaluating their operating procedures.

The company also offered FOX 5 the following statement:

“The satisfaction of our customers is our top priority. While we have standard procedures in place for the diagnosis of each customer’s situation to ensure they understand the product and services and the associated costs, we are listening to our customers in the D.C. area and are taking immediate action to address their concerns.

Going forward, any work that costs more than $499 will require a coordinator from our office to speak directly with the customer to further explain the benefits of the service and ensure they understand and authorize the service and payment. In addition, tomorrow we are also beginning ongoing training with our 35 D.C.-area Carpet Cleaning and Air Duct Cleaning franchise associates to ensure that our high standards of customer service are being met now and in the future.

Anyone who has a concern about Sears Carpet Cleaning and Air Duct Cleaning can call 800-586-1603 to speak with a national customer care representative.”

Source : http://www.fox5dc.com/news/local-news/more-homeowners-say-air-duct-cleaning-crew-scammed-them-following-fox-5-report

30 Jan 2019

NADCA Congratulates New Certification Holders, January 2019

As a leader in the air duct cleaning industry, NADCA offers two certifications; the Air Systems Cleaning Specialist (ASCS) certification and the Certified Ventilation Inspector (CVI) certification, credentials that are internationally recognized and known for showcasing an individual’s enhanced knowledge and skills related to HVAC system hygiene.

Congratulations to the following individuals who earned their Air Systems Cleaning Specialist (ASCS) certification during the month of January:

Erin Allen
Allen & Company Environmental Services

Fort Worth, TX USA

Amelia Antes
Stanley Steemer Great Lakes Inc.

Byron Center, MI USA

Branden Antes
Stanley Steemer Great Lakes Inc.

Byron Center, MI USA

Brandon Arvin
AdvantaClean of Southwest 
ChicagoLand
Chicago, IL USA

Gregory Barnes
Steamatic of Connecticut

North Haven, CT USA

Gerard Begin
First Atlantic Restoration

Virginia Beach, VA USA

Ricardo Castillo-Juarez
Steamatic of Connecticut

North Haven, CT USA

Chris Downie
Bravo Electrical and HVAC

Botany, NSW AUS

Ben Graham
Angel Clean

Neosho, MO USA

Rachael Leviner
DSK PRO INC dba Servpro of North Knoxville

Heiskell, TN USA

Illya Unhuryan
Remediation Specialists

Hamilton, NJ USA

Congratulations to the following individuals who earned their Certified Ventilation Inspector (CVI) certification during the month of January:

Rocco Belmonte
Sterimed SRL

Milano, ITA

Simone Bisoni
ALISEA S.R.L.
Mezzanino, (PV) ITA

Carmelo Coppola
Gravili SRL

Galatone, Lecce ITA

Giampaolo Ferrari
PIE Global Service S.r.l.

Calendasco, (PC) ITA

Andrea Manzi
Sell Condotte Srl

COLLEGNO, (TO) ITA

Roberto Molinari
Techno One S.r.l.

Paderno Dugnano, (MI) ITA

Federica Montanari
Techno One S.r.l.

Paderno Dugnano, (MI) ITA

Matteo Pirola
Air Klima SRL

Cene, Bergamo ITA

Giacomo Saliniti
Puliservice S.R.L.

Enna, (EN) ITA

Ivan Schincariol
Air Klima SRL

Cene, Bergamo ITA

Davide Sironi
Davide Sironi

Cerro Maggiore, (MI) ITA

Min Mihai Steorobelea
ALISEA S.R.L.

Mezzanino, (PV) ITA

Christopher Thome
Tampa Air Systems, Inc.

Tampa, FL USA

Massimo Vecchi
ALISEA S.R.L.

Mezzanino, (PV) ITA

01 Jan 2019

9 Furnace Maintenance Moves We All Forget That Raise Our Heating Bill

With winter roaring in at full speed, it’s time to brush up on your furnace maintenance skills. After all, you wouldn’t expect your car to run at top efficiency if you never change the oil, right?

Yet all too often, furnace maintenance gets shoved to the side as we crank the heat higher and higher, forcing this hard-working appliance to work harder than it has to. And that spells higher energy bills all around—and it’s bound to break sooner, too.

If the thought of a house with a broken furnace sends chills down your spine, follow these nine furnace maintenance tips so you can enjoy a lower gas bill this winter without walking around your house in a parka.

1. Change your filter

We’d be remiss to not state the obvious here, which is that your furnace filter needs regular attention.

“Make sure your filter is clean! This is a very simple and inexpensive way to help your HVAC system run more efficiently,” says Jeff Trucksa of K & J Heating and Cooling.

Your furnace filter should be changed at least once each season, but if you have pets, a lot of dust, or allergies, consider changing it every 30 to 60 days.

The first step in changing your filter is finding it, which can be more difficult than you might expect. It could be inside the cabinet of the furnace, between the furnace and the ductwork, or inside the ductwork itself. Turn off the furnace before you go hunting, and call your local HVAC company for help if you can’t find it.

Once you’ve located the filter, it’s as easy as sliding the old filter out and sliding the new filter in, using the markings on the filter to make sure it’s facing the right direction.

2. Keep return vents clear

There are actually two kinds of vents connected to your furnace: supply vents and return vents. Return vents pull air from inside your home and deliver it to the furnace, and supply vents blow that now-warm air back into your home.

“Do not block returns,” warns Trucksa. “Many people focus on not blocking vents, but if you block the returns you will starve the furnace for air and potentially overheat the furnace as well as not having even airflow throughout the house.”

There are a few ways to identify the return air vents if you’re not sure which ones they are. Return vents are usually larger than supply vents, they don’t have louvers to close them, and when your furnace is running, you won’t feel warm air from return vents.

Duct Cleaning
Duct Cleaning

3. Clean the ducts

It’s easy to overlook your home’s duct system—it is hidden, after all—but Nate Burlando, owner of Distinct Heating and Cooling, says it shouldn’t be ignored.

“Duct cleaning can improve your HVAC’s performance,” he explains. “Excess dust, mold, and pet dander can build up in your vents, preventing proper airflow.”

Having your ducts cleaned may be costly, but it might be worth it if you think you’re not getting enough from your furnace. While duct cleaning is not part of an annual furnace service, the HVAC specialist who does that check can let you know if yours needs to be cleaned.

4. Get a checkup

No matter how great you are at changing a filter, you should still have your furnace serviced by a professional at least once a year. According to Bell Bros. HVAC, up to 75% of no-heat calls made to heating and cooling companies are the direct result of ignoring regular maintenance. An expert can find issues that lessen efficiency, like faulty pilot lights. The pro will also keep an eye out for dangerous problems like a cracked heat exchanger, which can result in carbon monoxide leaking into your home.

Ceiling Fan
Ceiling Fan

5. Run your ceiling fans

Furnace maintenance is about how all your heating and cooling elements work together.

For instance, while you may think ceiling fans are only for the summer months, that’s not true. John Burkhardt of Burkhardt Air Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration says you should run them in the winter, too.

“Since hot air rises, running your ceiling fans in the reverse direction will push hot air from the ceiling down into the occupied space in your home,” he says.

Newer fans usually have a button on the motor housing that reverses the motor, while older models may require you to pull the cord until the direction switches. In the winter, your ceiling fan should be turning in a clockwise direction, so keep making adjustments until you see your blades moving in that direction.

6. Shut off those exhaust fans

While ceiling fans may be a good idea during the winter months, exhaust fans aren’t.

“If you have large attic fans or very strong exhaust fans like those typically in a bathroom or above a stove, they will remove heat from your house,” explains Larry Oglesby, HVAC expert at Remington College. “Don’t run them in the winter time.”

7. Seal up your attic

Since heat rises, a lot of the heat your furnace is putting out ends up in the attic—and eventually finds its way out through your roof. So sealing your attic and adding insulation to keep the heat out will make a big difference.

“The attic is where a lot of heat and energy gets lost,” explains Burlando. “Insulation can add a buffer, which will allow your internal temperature to regulate and maintain a comfortable level more easily.”

According to Energy Star, sealing your attic is not an easy task, and adding insulation can be tricky as well. If you’re a confident home-DIYer, you can attempt it, but it may be better (and more efficient) to call in the professionals for this job.

Humidifier
Humidifier

8. Run a humidifier

Running the furnace all winter can dry out your skin, but that’s not actually the reason we’re recommending you run a humidifier during the colder months.

According to Bolden Brothers Plumbing, Heating, and Air, dry air actually feels cooler than more humid air. That means you’re working your furnace harder by cranking it up, when a little humidity would have done the trick.

Your skin and your gas bill will thank you.

9. Invest in a smart thermostat

These things are more than just trendy gadgets.

“A smart thermostat will learn your schedule and adjust the temperature levels of your home to provide optimal comfort, while also saving on utility bills,” says Burlando. “No more extra energy spent heating an empty house or coming home to a freezing home.”

31 Dec 2018

NADCA Congratulates New Certification Holders, December 2018

NADCA Congratulates New Certification Holders, December 2018
As a leader in the air duct cleaning industry, NADCA offers two certifications; the Air Systems Cleaning Specialist (ASCS) certification and the Certified Ventilation Inspector (CVI) certification, credentials that are internationally recognized and known for showcasing an individual’s enhanced knowledge and skills related to HVAC system hygiene.

Congratulations to the following individuals who earned their Air Systems Cleaning Specialist (ASCS) certification during the month of December:

Christopher Burns
Pure Air Control Services DBA Building Remediation Sciences
Clearwater, FL USA

Pamela Gonzalez
Duct & Vent Cleaning of America, Inc.
Springfield, MA USA

Yossef Harari
Fair Duct Cleaning, LLC
Pikesville, MD USA

Luc Lessard
Le Pro du Conduit ll, Inc.
Sorel-Tracy, QC CAN

Drew Lipold
AdvantaClean of the West Side
North Olmsted, OH USA

Lucas Mangotich
Modern Purair – Victoria
Victoria, BC CAN

Michael Murphy
2119630 Alberta Ltd.
St. Albert, AB CAN

Steve Pezold
Clean Air Columbia
Centralia, MO USA

William Scarborough
Disaster Services, LLC
Pine Mountain, GA USA

Tejas Vispute
A & S Outsourcing Solutions
Mumbai – Maharashtra, IND

Justin Woodward
Ventcare Inc.
Markham, ON CAN

Devin Zvolanek
Mold Terminator Inc.
Eads, TN USA

31 Dec 2018

NADCA Congratulates New Certification Holders, November 2018

NADCA Congratulates New Certification Holders, November 2018
As a leader in the air duct cleaning industry, NADCA offers two certifications; the Air Systems Cleaning Specialist (ASCS) certification and the Certified Ventilation Inspector (CVI) certification, credentials that are internationally recognized and known for showcasing an individual’s enhanced knowledge and skills related to HVAC system hygiene.

Congratulations to the following individuals who earned their Air Systems Cleaning Specialist (ASCS) certification during the month of November:

Paolo Bruni
GWA S.r.l.
Anagni (FR), ITA

Warren Cousin
Stanley Steemer – Houston
Houston, TX USA

Daniel Crowder
Snyder Heating & Air Conditioning
Jacksonville, FL USA

Pierpaolo Di Cosimo
GWA S.r.l.
Anagni (FR), ITA

Joseph Ewing
Graves Sheet Metal
Kokomo, IN USA

Giampaolo Ferrari
PIE Global Services S.r.l.
Calendasco (PC), ITA

Mohamed Gadalla
Sketch
Doha, QAT

Frédéric Gesret
9389628 Canada Inc. GUS Témiscamingue
New Liskeard, ON CAN

Mike Graalman
Stanley Steemer of Greensboro
Greensboro, NC USA

Jesse Ham
Snyder Heating & Air Conditioning
Jacksonville, FL USA

Joevian Harrison
Stanley Steemer
Stratford, CT USA

Anthony Johnson
Ready Services Mechanical, LLC
Tulsa, OK USA

Imtiaz Khan
Professional Duct Cleaning and Home Care
Glen Ellyn, IL USA

Cecilia Leonforte
PFE S.p.A.
Milano (MI), ITA

Fred Meucci
Hranec Sheet Metal Inc.
Uniontown, PA USA

David Mohler
Stanley Steemer of Roanoke
Salem, VA USA

Frederica Montanari
Techno One S.r.l.
Paderno Dugnano (MI), ITA

Mario Montis
Figus Eugenio
Pabillonis (CA), ITA

Michele Ranieri
Ranieri Impiantistica Srl
Ottaviano (NA), ITA

Mike Scalera
Stanley Steemer of South Florida Inc.
Delray Beach, FL USA

Sammy Scalera
Stanley Steemer of South Florida Inc.
Delray Beach, FL USA

Mark Souza
Duct & Vent Cleaning of America, Inc.
Springfield, MA USA

Ronald Wilkinson
Stanley Steemer – Nashville
Nashville, TN USA

Congratulations to the following individuals who earned their Certified Ventilation Inspector (CVI) certification during the month of November:

Francesco Albergo
Tecnomedica S.R.L.
MODUGNO (BA), ITA

Stefano Busiello
FENICE SpA
Rivoli, ITA

Giuseppe D’Aleo
Project Clean Group S.r.l.
Trezzano sul Naviglio, (MI), ITA

Andrea Filipponi
Ciana Srl
Roma, ITA

Rocco Intini
SELPA S.r.l.
Palagiano (TA), ITA

Robin Larochelle
9389628 Canada Inc. GUS Témiscamingue
New Liskeard, ON CAN

Giorgio Martelli
Integra S.r.l.
Pescara, ITA

Armando Marzocchi
So.Ge.Ser. Tecnology Srl
Napoli, ITA

Giancarlo Zucchet
Zucchet Aldo Srl
Roma, ITA

31 Dec 2018

NADCA Congratulates New Certification Holders, October 2018

As a leader in the air duct cleaning industry, NADCA offers two certifications; the Air Systems Cleaning Specialist (ASCS) certification and the Certified Ventilation Inspector (CVI) certification, credentials that are internationally recognized and known for showcasing an individual’s enhanced knowledge and skills related to HVAC system hygiene.

Congratulations to the following individuals who earned their Air Systems Cleaning Specialist (ASCS) certification during the month of October:

Matthew Ahrens
SEMPRO, LLC dba DUCTZ of Miami Valley and Columbus
Springfield, OH USA

Leo Albinger
Air Duct Maintenance, Inc.
Bakerstown, PA USA

Jamie Baker
DUCTZ of the Upper Bay Region
Fallston, MD USA

Brennen Belanger
Air Busters Inc.
Windsor, ON CAN

Jacob Blockland
Servpro of Laporte & Porter Counties
Valparaiso, IN USA

David Breckenridge
Cool Zone Inc
Naples, FL USA

Rey David Castaneda
ServiceMaster Rapid Response
Dodge City, KS USA

Conner Conklin
Servpro of Laporte & Porter Counties
Valparaiso, IN USA

Wade Conley
Power Vac-BELFOR
Dartmouth, NS CAN

Ryan Crane
AdvantaClean of East Central Ohio
Newark, OH USA

Raul De La Torre
ServiceMaster Rapid Response
Dodge City, KS USA

Joe Ebright
Advanced Air Service Group
Aston, PA USA

Mike Galloway
Atlas Butler
Columbus, OH USA

Jim Grady
General Aire Systems
Darby, PA USA

Jon Grafton
Air Duct Maintenance, Inc.
Bakerstown, PA USA

Brandon Hector
PT Mechanical Group
Moorestown, NJ USA

James Heredia
Duct Detectives, Inc.
Orlando, FL USA

Scott Himes
Controlled Environment Technologies
York, PA USA

Henry Hodges
Power Vac America, Inc.
Houston, TX USA

Neil Hyson
Power Vac-BELFOR
Dartmouth, NS CAN

Chris Jones
Atlas Butler
Columbus, OH USA

Brent Levan
Comfort Temp Company
Gainesville, FL USA

Stacy Liedle
AdvantaClean of the Eastside
Kenmore, WA USA

George Logothetis
AMS Restoration
East Brunswick, NJ USA

Saul Lumbreras
DSI Holding
Downers Grove, IL USA

Shane MacRae
Reliance Home Comfort
Toronto, ON CAN

Shanoop Mada Valappil
SaniService LLC
Dubai, ARE

Dane Meier
Stanley Steemer St Louis
Maryland Heights, MO USA

Tim Miller
Mite-E-Ducts
Zionsville, IN USA

Andrew Mitchell
Professional Duct Cleaning
Swansea, MA USA

Jay Prakash Motghare
Nirmitee Robotics India Private Limited
Nagpur, IND

Christian Norton
AdvantaClean of East Central Ohio
Newark, OH USA

Jake Ohl
Tri-Dim Filter Corporation
Roanoke, VA USA

Nick Plano
Action Cooling & Heating, Inc.
Fort Myers, FL USA

Jeffrey Reedus
Coit Services of Kentuckiana
Louisville, KY USA

Mike Rivera
CLEAR Air, Inc.
Des Moines, IA USA

Santos Rodriguez
Action Cooling & Heating, Inc.
Fort Myers, FL USA

Robert Sage
Federal Maintenance Hawaii, Inc.
Honolulu, HI USA

Erik Sandoval
Air Ducts Done Right, Inc.
Darien, IL USA

Jason Schlosser
DUCTZ of the Upper Bay Region
Fallston, MD USA

Steve Schur
Central Home Services Corp. DBACenvacs
Scarsdale, NY USA

Paul Sharkey
Belfor
Quispamsis, NB CAN

Melanie Sieg
United Safety Services, Inc.
Carnegie, PA USA

Ryan Smith
Superior Air Duct Cleaning
New Brighton, PA USA

Chris Sullivan
Safety King, Inc.
Shelby Township, MI USA

Dijo Thomas
EPSCO LLC
Dubai, ARE

Cesar Vidaurri
ACL Facility Services, LLC
Pflugerville, TX USA

Angel Villalobos
DSI Holding
Downers Grove, IL USA

Taylor Westcott
Basnett Plumbing, Heating & AC
Littleton, MA USA

Chris White
Advanced Air Service Group
Aston, PA USA

Joshua Wilkerson
Coit Services of Kentuckiana
Louisville, KY USA

Paul Wyble
Air Duct Maintenance, Inc.
Bakerstown, PA USA

Austin Yang
Alpine Specialty Cleaning Inc.
Mountlake Terrace, WA USA

Hayden York
Healthy Building Systems Aust Pty Ltd
Victoria Park, WA AUS

Congratulations to the following individuals who earned their Certified Ventilation Inspector (CVI) certification during the month of October:

Scott Hunt
PT Mechanical Group
Moorestown, NJ USA

Terry Lee III
United Safety Services, Inc.
Carnegie, PA USA

Dan L’Herbier
Air Duct Maintenance, Inc.
Bakerstown, PA USA

Angel Lopez
Duct Detectives, Inc.
Orlando, FL USA

Zachary Ortwine
Hyper Clean Duct Cleaning, LLC
Midlothian, VA USA

Rafael Rivera
PureAir Indoor Solutions
Margate, FL USA

Chris Schafer
K-tech Kleening Systems, Inc.
Schofield, WI USA

Justin Tarr
Daffy Ducts
Snellville, GA USA

Mark Zarzeczny
Advanced Clean Air Specialists, LLC
Philadelphia, PA USA

05 Dec 2018

NADCA Congratulates New Certification Holders, September 2018

As a leader in the air duct cleaning industry, NADCA offers two certifications; the Air Systems Cleaning Specialist (ASCS) certification and the Certified Ventilation Inspector (CVI) certification, credentials that are internationally recognized and known for showcasing an individual’s enhanced knowledge and skills related to HVAC system hygiene.

Congratulations to the following individuals who earned their Air Systems Cleaning Specialist (ASCS) certification during the month of September:

Taylor Evans
Air Duct Services, a division of BMCA, Inc.
Braintree, MA USA

Richard Godinez
D.E.V. Industries, Inc.
West Covina, CA USA

Filipp Golikov
Top Notch Restoration
Wood Dale, IL USA

Steven Kee
Drying Solutions, Inc.
Virginia Beach, VA USA

Christopher Moore
Boog Air Pty Ltd
Berrimah, NT AUS

Shagufa Parkar
EPSCO Delhi Pvt. Ltd.
New Delhi, IND

Tracy Pearsall
DUCT DOCTOR U.S.A. OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
Jupiter, FL USA

Jeff Propps
American Air Purification LLC
Westerville, OH USA

Dr. Sri Ramchandra Rao Jami
Duct Cleaning Specialist LLC
Abu Dhabi, ARE

04 Nov 2018

How to Get Rid of Mice in Heating Ducts

Mice often use the dark corners of the home – from fireplaces to exhaust vents to attics – as their own personal transit system. Heating and cooling ducts form the core of this rodent highway. The critters take refuge in the ducts after pillaging your food supplies, posing an unsanitary threat to health. They can cause problems with smell when they die in the spaces. Prevent both instances from happening with time-tested trapping methods.

Steps:

Turn off your heating or central air conditioning system. Allow the heating grates to cool completely.

Remove all grates covering your heating vents. You may need a screwdriver to pry them off or remove screws.

Load snap traps, one for each heating vent in the home, with fragrant baits to stimulate the rodents’ keen sense of smell. Bacon, cheese, chocolate, dried fruit and peanut butter all serve this purpose well. Arm the traps according to the manufacturer’s instructions.

Place one trap just inside each duct, sliding it up against the duct’s interior wall with the bait end touching the wall to form “T” shape. Putting traps inside the duct targets duct-dwelling mice specifically and keeps the traps out of reach of pets and small children. Use mouse droppings to determine paths followed by mice and place traps along the paths.

Replace all heating vent grates and run your heat as usual.

Check the traps for mice each morning. Look into the vent slats with a flashlight. If the trap holds a mouse, remove the grate and take the trap out of the duct. Wearing rubber gloves, remove the mouse and seal it in a plastic zipper storage bag. Dispose of the dead mouse and wash your hands with antibacterial soap. Continue to trap and dispose of mice until you’ve eliminated your home’s rodent population.

Block entry points to prevent the problem in the future. Check your roof and wall vents for gaps between the duct and the wall. Secure fine wire mesh over these gaps to prevent mice from entering the heating ducts. Do the same for other common entry points, such as gaps and holes around door and window frames, pipes, fireplaces, wall junctures and roof rafters.

Tip

Humane traps are available if you want to relocate the mice instead of killing them. They work like the traps one sets for raccoons and other animals, but are much smaller.

Warning

Avoid using poison traps to get rid of mice in your heating ducts. This control method does not kill on contact, leaving mice to die deep in the heating ducts or inside walls, where their carcasses emit extremely foul odors.

Suggestion

Once you catch all the mice inside your air ducts and the rest of the home, we suggest calling a company to clean and disinfect you air ducts. Visit our Business Rating section to easily locate a professional near you.

24 Oct 2018

What the Sears bankruptcy means for Sears home services

Though Sears is struggling, that doesn’t mean everything with a Sears name is in trouble.

Hoffman Estates, Illinois-based Sears Holdings Corp. last week filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection and will be closing another 142 Sears and Kmart stores by year-end, on top of 46 stores already slated to be shuttered.

But the Sears name applies to more than just the department stores.

Sears Home & Business Franchises is a wholly owned subsidiary of Sears so it is part of the company’s bankruptcy filing, but on a day-to-day basis the Columbus-based business operates separately with its own leaders, offices, IT, accounting, marketing, sales, etc.

“Given that we have the same name, there’s some consumer confusion,” said President Jeff Pepperney. “The services we provide aren’t being interrupted one bit. We’re freestanding from Sears.”

There are five service categories under the franchising business: Sears Carpet/Upholstery CleaningSears Air Duct CleaningSears Garage SolutionsSears Maid Services and Sears Handyman Solutions.

“People buy businesses from us because they’re leveraging that name, Sears. It drives consumer trust and commitment,” Pepperney said. “But we are family-owned businesses. Those families aren’t changing. They’re still out there, providing service.”

The 50-person corporate staff of Sears Home & Business Franchises has been based in the Polaris area since it was created 20 years ago and now oversees a franchise network of 140 franchisees overseeing 400 territories in the U.S.

Full article can be found here

17 Oct 2018

The Mars School District is continuing to address issues with their air quality.

In the latest letter to parents, Superintendent Dr. Wesley Shipley says duct work cleaning and additional testing have been recommended for Mars Elementary School after the most recent air quality testing was done.

Last month, complaints of a “musty smell” by students and staff promoted the district to order testing.

Detailed test information is available here.